Empires End in the Dustbin of History

Stefan the Great, Athleta Christi, (1457-1504) Romanian ruler who fought the Ottoman Empire in 36 battles and won 34
Photo: descopera.ro
Empires come and go. The twilight of western civilization is not just a poetic idea, it is a painful reality. Liberals often say that they do not like to make broadly pessimistic pronouncements about the collective fate of civilization. Of course not, it might upset their blind followers who dwell in the haze of marijuana, hard-core drugs, immorality, decadence, and debauchery. Continue reading

Mississippians Are Resilient People

My azaleas in Mississippi
Photo: Ileana Johnson 2004
As a resident of Mississippi for thirty years, I learned that living in the tornado alley close to Tupelo meant that downpours, high winds, and spun-seemingly-out-of-nowhere tornadoes were a weekly occurrence during hurricane season. Continue reading

Such Native Roots


There’s an interesting store in the local mall that had intrigued me for a long time. I’ve never been inside until today; I just passed by the window display and tried to ignore it every time. Occasionally I took pictures of the same two t-shirts, a red and a green one. One day the store was empty and another merchant was occupying the space. I made a mental note of relief that it was gone. Continue reading

Toilet Paper with Wood Chips

Photo: Ileana Johnson

Huffing and puffing, I lug the large package of toilet paper from our local Costco into the house. It’s not that the price is better; I just don’t want to go to the store more often than I have to. I stood in lines enough during my twenty years of living under the boot of communism. Continue reading

Bolshevik-Style Cultural Purge

“If I had a world of my own, everything would be nonsense. Nothing would be what it is, because everything would be what it isn’t. And contrary wise, what is, it wouldn’t be. And what it wouldn’t be, it would. You see?” – Mad Hatter, character in Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland Continue reading

The Technology of Yesteryear


Photo Wikipedia: 1950 Leica IIIf-600
The world around us is changing vertiginously. It’s not that I am getting older and my perspective has slowed down; technology and the way we live are being fundamentally transformed under our own eyes, but we are too busy to notice. Continue reading

Is This Our New America?

Golden Eagle with chopped wing Photo: Wikipedia

Golden Eagle with chopped wing
Photo: Wikipedia


The young woman was shopping on the 75 percent off rack of children’s clothes. Our eyes met and she smiled; in these hard times we must shop wisely to make money stretch further, she said. I remember those years in the mid-twenties, with two babies, a mom to support, and at least three part-time jobs. I never complained, blamed rich people, rioted to burn down other people’s hard work, or demanded that they turn their accumulated wealth over to me. It was a time when law and order mattered. Effort and hard work eventually paid off when I made a huge and lengthy investment in human capital – my education. Continue reading

The Rioting for Pay Work Ethic

field of corn Tirgsorul Vechi 2011 Photo: Ileana Johnson 2014
The old corn fields of my childhood where we often worked in
As a teenager, I could not work summer jobs for minimum wage in order to learn a work ethic. For starters, the communist labor system did not allow for remunerated child employment of any sort, at any age. It was not that hard work was for tractors like American smart-alecky youth say nowadays. There were no teenage jobs to be had. But we learned plenty about work ethic when we helped our families survive and maintain a meager place to live. Continue reading

President Trump, Preserve Our American Exceptionalism

The Trump mobile by Finnish Florida couple (dozens of car parts) Photo credit: NBC
The Trump Mobile made by Finnish couple in Florida from many car parts
The sun rose today, January 20, 2017, on a cloudy and rainy day but I was dancing of joy inside. I cried and felt as if a heavy burden was lifted off my chest, the crumbling stone of anti-Americanism and communism. Continue reading

The Snow of My Childhood

florentina-apostolescu-photo Photo: Florentina A. 2017
The first snow of 2017 finally arrived; a couple of inches covered the ground early before sunrise, turning our world into a powdery-white winter wonderland. The woods were unusually quiet and the animals disappeared with the exception of the resident fox. She ran from the back bushes and left a trail of swirling dry snow disturbed by her bushy tail. My two squirrels were nowhere to be seen. Continue reading